Why do landlords get away with murder in Australia?

Tenant rights lawyers have been getting away with killing their tenants in the country’s most populous state, because it’s easier to do so than to fight them in court.

Lawyers in Sydney’s south-east, which includes the western suburbs of Brunswick and Richmond, have been using the tactic for years, and the practice has been on the rise in recent years.

It’s been described as “legalised murder” because of the way tenants are evicted, their possessions destroyed and their homes taken away.

In 2015, more than 30 per cent of people evicted from their homes in Sydney had been killed, according to the Australian Property Lawyers Association.

The AQLA said in a statement that its members had “a long history of protecting the rights of tenants”.

But, according, it said, “there is nothing inherently criminal about the practice”.

“Tenants in NSW have been unlawfully evicted and their possessions have been destroyed, often in their own homes.

It is no longer an acceptable means of protection for tenants in NSW,” it said.

“It is common for tenant rights lawyers to target tenants based on their racial, national, gender, religious, disability, sexual orientation, economic status, age, disability or any other basis protected by law.”

The AJP said it was “very concerned” about the new legislation.

“We have always had the right to defend ourselves against these actions by landlords, and in NSW the law does not protect tenants from landlord-related abuse,” a spokeswoman said.

It said tenants should not fear retaliation because landlords were allowed to evict them without legal recourse.

But the AJP says the law needs to be changed to protect tenants.

“Tenant rights law in NSW has always been very robust and we have fought for years for the protection of our tenants and tenants rights,” the AIPA spokeswoman said in the statement.

“To be able to get away from tenants rights law, is a good step in the right direction. “

“But in order for that to happen, there needs to need to be a change in the law.” “

It’s not the first time the practice of killing tenants has come under scrutiny in Australia. “

But in order for that to happen, there needs to need to be a change in the law.”

It’s not the first time the practice of killing tenants has come under scrutiny in Australia.

In the 1990s, a New South Wales judge ordered a tenant to give up her home after she was shot by her landlord.

A subsequent Supreme Court ruling overturned the decision and she was allowed to stay on the property, but was not able to sell her house.

A case has been pending since.

Tenants rights lawyer David Whitehead said the new law was an attempt to “create a loophole”.

“The AQLAs legislation is clearly designed to enable the use of force, to create a loophole, and we think that this loophole is designed to be exploited,” he said.